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Don't be that guy: why wedding vendors shouldn't publicly rant about work

Every once and while, a wedding vendor will perhaps forget that Offbeat Bride isn't an industry publication. Every once and a while, we'll get ranting, vitriolic comments from vendors about how stupid brides are, how little couples understand about what vendors do, how this one time this one couple did this totally awful thing, how they want to strangled a certain mother of the bride, etc etc etc.

But wedding industry friends, for the good of your business: don't be that guy.

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How to talk to (and about) your clients when their gender identities are complex

Gender identities are complex, and the words we use to talk about gender are constantly evolving. Whether or not you spend a lot of time in a gender-ambiguous world, as a business-owner, you need to know that it's important to be aware of the different ways people can gender identify, and that it's even more important to respect those identities. It's not always easy to discern someone's gender identity by sight, so here are three different ways I've gone about determining how my clients identify in a subtle, respectful way…

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Inclusive advertising that doesn't pander

I work in Iowa, where same-sex marriage is legal (whoot for equality), and I was recently asked by my workplace to put together a brochure about the wedding rental facilities we have available — pavilions, parks, that sort of thing.

I am already planning on including a "We rent to everyone, regardless of who you're in love with " in the FAQs, but I want to make a bigger statement with the actual design.

On the flip side, I don't want to seem like I'm blatantly pandering for the sake of it — I guess in my mind, I just feel like it's somewhat exploitative to include a picture of two brides or two grooms just because "See how different they are? AND WE DON'T EVEN CARE!!"

What do you think? What's the best way to advertise in a non-gender specific way? How would you do it?