3.0k

Onward, Offbeat Resilience: the book that became Shitshow

A couple months back, I mentioned I was working away on trying to sell my second book, ONWARD. The first draft of the book was completed, but a series of literary agents and publishers all had the same feedback: you can't sell this particular book, in this particular format.

So I hired a familiar face to help me rework it into a better format…

1.9k

Let's talk about clickbait

I think of clickbait as manipulative and forcing your hand (ie "This bride got left at the altar — YOU WON'T BELIEVE WHAT SHE DID NEXT"), but the truth of publishing is that a huge portion of a publisher's job is what's known as content marketing.

How do you make sure that people who are interested in your content A) see it and B) are interested enough in it to click through to read it? People do NOT want to leave Facebook, so it's a significant challenge.

1.3k

5 ways we optimize old blog posts into super sticky landing pages

Web overlords often refer to "landing page optimization" when they talk about making users into "conversions." The user is converted when they sign up for the email newsletter, buys the product, drinks the Kool-Aid, etc.

While blogging has its crossovers, what the Offbeat Empire wants our landing pages to do is get readers deeeeeper into the sites. We want to show them what we've got, what differentiates us from similar blogs, and secondarily, to get them engaged with our various communication and social media touch points. Web publishing loves something sticky.

The strategy we're working on these days is to find older blog posts that are organically getting major traffic and, assuming that many of these readers are new to us, introduce them to the site and get them clicking on links. One example of this kind of "landing page" blog post is "Wedding invitation wording that won't make you barf," something Ariel originally wrote back in 2007 that still gets 47,000 unique hits a month.

Here's how we try to get readers to stick around…